Reviews

In the slums of Accra, Ghana’s fast-moving, cosmopolitan capital, teenagers are turning up dead. Inspector Darko Dawson has seen many crimes, but this latest string of murders—in which all the young victims bear a chilling signature—is the most unsettling of his career. Are these heinous acts a form of ritual killing or the work of a lone, cold-blooded monster? With time running out, Dawson embarks on a harrowing journey through the city’s underbelly and confronts the brutal world of the urban poor, where street children are forced to fight for their very survival—and a cunning killer seems just out of reach. — Amazon.com Product Description

“Quartey cleverly hides the culprit, but the whodunit’s strength is as much in the depiction of a world largely unfamiliar to an American readership as in its playing fair…”—STARRED Publisher’s Weekly

“…As in Wife of the Gods (2009), the real star is Accra, which the killer aptly describes as “the perfect place for a murder.”—Kirkus Book Reviews

“Searing and original and done just right . . . Inspector Darko Dawson is relentless, and I look forward to riding with him again.”—Bestselling Author Michael Connelly

“Darko Dawson, with his secret struggle to stop smoking marijuana and his son’s chronic illness, is one of the most engaging characters this reader has ever encountered. The police work, the unexpected reveal of the murderer and the motivation for the killings, and the clever interactions among characters of widely different professions and social classes will completely satisfy readers who enjoyed the first book and intrigue newcomers.”—Library Journal

Detective Darko Dawson, Kwei Quartey’s memorable creation,is an inspector in the Ghanaian police force, working out of the capitol of Ghana, Accra…He’s smart and relentless, but he’s also compassioante and willing to learn.  Quartey’s so far two novels, Wife of the Gods and Children of the Streets, are knockouts. Get to know “Dark”, as he’s called by his friends.”—Robin Agnew, Dead Guy Blog

“Kwei Quartey’s Children of the Street may be a fictional crime drama, but it takes place in the very real slum of Agbogbloshie in the heart of Ghana’s capital, Accra…With an enticing plot, well-stocked with twists and turns, and a dynamic and imperfect protagonist, Children of the Street is a great read for diehard crime-novel enthusiasts and leisure readers alike.”—Joshua Weaver, The Root

“There’s an underlying sweetness to Children of the Street that helps balance the horrific nature of the crimes being investigated…The city and its environs are an integral part of the story, and…so are its people, culture and beliefs. Children of the Street is much more than just a whodunit-style mystery — and to that end, it’s a pretty good one at that — it is a dynamic portrait of a city that most readers of the book will likely never have an opportunity to visit.”—Mysterious Reviews

Children Of The Street is a meticulous and compelling detective yarn…Dawson is a dogged and meticulous investigator…Quartey’s writing style is attractive, well paced and gripping…[He] juxtaposes fear and tension beautifully and human interactions are convincing and real.”—Dean Mayes, Goodreads

“Dr. Quartey is a masterful story-teller…He guides the readers to a grasp of the culture and the circumstances in which his characters live by making the introduction of this information an integral part of the story.  We are being taught without realizing that a lesson is being presented.”—Beth Crowley, Murder by Type