Electronic waste in Ghana: a mountainous problem

Ever wonder where your electronic waste (e-waste) – computers, TVs, and the like – ends up? When we go to those hazardous materials depots in different cities, most of us imagine that all this stuff goes to a special “hazmat” incinerator that crushes all this junk up and contains it in a hermetically sealed container. Unfortunately it’s not that simple.

In the process of researching for my novel CHILDREN OF THE STREET I visited a slum in Accra (capital of Ghana) called Agbogbloshie (AG-BOG-BLO-SHE) where it turns out much of the e-waste from the US and Europe end up.

Recently, two articles on this topic in which I was involved have appeared online. The first is at ScrippsNews (as well as projo.com and The Cap Times). It’s about the people I met when I went to Agbogbloshie and my first experience with the staggering problem of e-waste, some of it piled high like “mountains” of trash.

The second is at Mongabay.com. This article includes an online conversation with me and looks in-depth at how e-waste gets to places like Agbogbloshie in developing countries , and what e-waste does to people and the environment.

Mongabay.com is an important online environmental science and conservation news site with more than a million visitors per month worldwide. It’s been featured in the San Francisco Chronicle, Time Magazine, and others. It is a visually striking website and a fantastic source of information to those who care about the earth and its preservation.

< Back